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Starving Artist Sales


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#1 DavidGillespie78

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Posted 11 January 2007 - 02:12 PM

About 20 years ago, my Mother wanted me to take her to this huge art sale she read about in the paper. It was called a Starving Artist Sale. There were tons of original oil paintings and frames to fit them. The paintings were mostly good, some VERY well done. The prices were rediculously low. Now the same sales take place at large hotels and are well advertized events. The same type of paintings (and frames) also show up at flea markets, again in all sizes - some huge (48X60 inches), and prices far cheaper than I could buy the materials and paint it myself. They are now in Wal-Mart and on eBay too. I have a pretty good idea that these paintnigs come from Asian sweat shops and are probably produced assembly line style. I even ran across some in a big name gallery in Key West last year. What I found out (after a lot of asking around) about those particular paintings is that while on a trip to some third world place, the gallery owner or manager ran across a huge stack of very nice paintings on unstretched canvas. He bought them for less than a buck each and had them stretched and beautifully framed, giving them all one artist name (Milan, I think it was, which I can say because it isn't a real person - it's a pen name or brush name for several painters). The gallery workers simply said that it was a new artist about whom nothing much is known except that he only does originals and is very serious and very secretive.) Were it not for the fact that dealers are not forthcoming about their origins and they are sold around here cheaper than I can buy the actual materials, I wouldn't mind them being on the market (the sweat shop factor notwithstanding). Does anyone realy know where these "hungry artist" paintings come from? Please enlighten us.
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David
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#2 Violet

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Posted 11 January 2007 - 03:50 PM

QUOTE(DavidGillespie78 @ Jan 11 2007, 02:12 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
About 20 years ago, my Mother wanted me to take her to this huge art sale she read about in the paper. It was called a Starving Artist Sale. There were tons of original oil paintings and frames to fit them. The paintings were mostly good, some VERY well done. The prices were rediculously low. Now the same sales take place at large hotels and are well advertized events. The same type of paintings (and frames) also show up at flea markets, again in all sizes - some huge (48X60 inches), and prices far cheaper than I could buy the materials and paint it myself. They are now in Wal-Mart and on eBay too. I have a pretty good idea that these paintnigs come from Asian sweat shops and are probably produced assembly line style. I even ran across some in a big name gallery in Key West last year. What I found out (after a lot of asking around) about those particular paintings is that while on a trip to some third world place, the gallery owner or manager ran across a huge stack of very nice paintings on unstretched canvas. He bought them for less than a buck each and had them stretched and beautifully framed, giving them all one artist name (Milan, I think it was, which I can say because it isn't a real person - it's a pen name or brush name for several painters). The gallery workers simply said that it was a new artist about whom nothing much is known except that he only does originals and is very serious and very secretive.) Were it not for the fact that dealers are not forthcoming about their origins and they are sold around here cheaper than I can buy the actual materials, I wouldn't mind them being on the market (the sweat shop factor notwithstanding). Does anyone realy know where these "hungry artist" paintings come from? Please enlighten us.
Thanks,
David

I've also seen the commercials for these sales. I have heard that they are from Asia and that they are done assembly line style. One person does the sky, one the tree, one the leaves on the tree, etc... If this is true, it is a shame, becuase people are essential being lied to.
~Violet

#3 jhand

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Posted 14 January 2007 - 10:17 PM

A lot of those are done by actual painters who will sign them, but though they are actually often very attractive, they really only are about technique. Kind of like the Bob Ross method. If you look at them you start to see how simplistic they can be and once the technique is down it doesn't take very long to do them no matter how large. In fact this weekend I was out with my family and there was one of those galleries and they had one of their artists set up in front. He was starting when we got to the plaza and finishing when we left. Not to be snobby, they found a niche in the market and are selling their work, but what really makes a work art is composition, and that is what they lack.
Jeremy

#4 jensdesign

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Posted 11 September 2007 - 10:12 AM

QUOTE(jhand @ Jan 14 2007, 10:17 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
A lot of those are done by actual painters who will sign them, but though they are actually often very attractive, they really only are about technique. Kind of like the Bob Ross method. If you look at them you start to see how simplistic they can be and once the technique is down it doesn't take very long to do them no matter how large. In fact this weekend I was out with my family and there was one of those galleries and they had one of their artists set up in front. He was starting when we got to the plaza and finishing when we left. Not to be snobby, they found a niche in the market and are selling their work, but what really makes a work art is composition, and that is what they lack.
Jeremy


I agree with Jeremy. Art for me, is about concept and ideas also. I love abstract art. I love fantasy art. I love to see inside someone's imagination. These are things that cannot be copied. They are priceless. Technique is technique, but it has no meaning to me unless applied to concept.

Jen
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#5 jack

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Posted 11 September 2007 - 10:23 AM

A quick and difinative answer here - They are done in china assmebly line style by people who get paid pennies a day. They sign western names to them.
Jack

#6 jensdesign

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Posted 11 September 2007 - 10:31 AM

QUOTE(jack @ Sep 11 2007, 10:23 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
A quick and difinative answer here - They are done in china assmebly line style by people who get paid pennies a day. They sign western names to them.


That is just really really sad. sad.gif

#7 Violet

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Posted 11 September 2007 - 01:49 PM

QUOTE(jensdesign @ Sep 11 2007, 11:31 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
That is just really really sad. sad.gif

I agree, it almost sounds abusive to the artists that do the work.
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#8 jack

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Posted 11 September 2007 - 02:41 PM

They are not artists, they are laborers.
Jack

#9 jensdesign

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Posted 11 September 2007 - 04:35 PM

QUOTE(jack @ Sep 11 2007, 02:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
They are not artists, they are laborers.


Its sad that they work for pennies, yes. But its more sad for art. Because there are so many people that don't really understand art...and when they see these factory produced artworks, they don't understand art even more. The perception is that its easy and meaningless. Thats sad.



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