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Difference Between Print And Lithograph?


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#1 shay

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 07:35 PM

Hi, I inherited a large print or lithograph by A E Beanie Backus. It is signed twice,and numbered. It is "Flamboyant." My relatives purchased it directly from Backus, and indeed, since my uncle was a prominent member of the community, Backus, if I recall, came to their house and they went to his studio or house. I was younger so I don't know all the details.

A few years ago the frame developed bugs inside of it - powder post bugs? - I don't know. So I threw away the frame and sat the print/lithograph aside. Two years ago, when moving, I rolled the print/lithograph up and it remains rolled up.

I am now in need to sell it. What I don't know is how to determine if it is a print or a lithograph or are they the same?

Also, I was told that since I had rolled it up, no one would buy it since there are "issues" with rolling something like this up. It is a hard card stock of some sort, not all that tightly rolled, btw. But rolled it is. I was told it would be difficult to reframe it. Even if I wished to keep it, I still think it is frame-able, so if someone could also address this issue, I would appreciate it. Tips, etc., if possible.

Also, if I do manage to sell it, how would I send it to the buyer - rolled up or framed? framed in glass? framed in plexiglass? between heavy cardboard/no frame? between what?

This particular print is often on the market, framed, for $2000 but I would ask lower. I know it has value, and I was ignorant as to how to maintain it out of its frame (I didn't have the money to reframe it.) I understand all of that but would like input as to what I might do to accommodate a sale - and maybe, even where to try to sell it.

The attachment is a picture of Flamboyant but NOT the one I own. It is however identical to mine. I'm including it to demostrate how large it is.

Thanks very much.

shay0449__Flamboyant_litho.jpg

#2 jack

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 10:52 PM

Shay,
We certainly cant tell how large it is from the photo. Anyway, I assume you have no paperwork with the piece.

The term "print" is a generic term and really can mean "any reproduction" That being said most people relate the word print with a cheap poster.

Since this is on heavy card stock as you say I doubt that is it just a cheap poster.

Rolling a quality piece should be no problem and that is how you would ship it to your buyer.

Lets talk about the signatures. You say it is signed twice. Is it one hand signature and one plate signature? Is there any numbering at all on the piece?

There is a Backus collector in Florida that you can contact who may be interested in buying your piece and most likely can help you find out what you have.

His contact info is here:


A. E. Beanie Backus

I hope that helps. Keep us informed. I am curious as to what happens.
Jack

#3 shay

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Posted 22 January 2006 - 04:51 PM

Hi, Jack, thank you for the post and for the information. It is indeed on hard stock, not flimsy paper, so I now assume it is what is called a lithograph. It's definitely not a poster and it was a "prize" piece in my relatives household.

Sorry the photo didn't convey how large it is!

Yes, it is numbered. It is 311 out of 1,000. It is written on the lithograph.

I discovered the "two signature" thing when I was doing research on the web - someone had mentioned it in regard to another Backus lithograph and sure enough, mine has it also. It appears to have been signed when the original painting was done and then the lithograph was also signed. So, two signatures. Backus did not sign in script apparently - he prints; so therefore, both signatures are printed. The original also has the date he finished the painting.

I am a little familiar with that site you mentioned since I ran across it in my research on Backus awhile back. I appreciate the link. For some reason, I never emailed that site but chose another - I think it was because the other site had two of these lithographs for sale - the same exact one, framed, for $2,000 (this was several months ago). The owner emailed back and told me, in a kind of elitist way, that (and this is a quote) "Rolling a print can be very damaging to it. Paper has a memory and it is often very difficult to flatten out after prolonged storage. We do handle prints but only if they are framed and on perfect condition."

I now assume she thought it was of poster quality??? I understand paper has a memory but this is hard card stock and I don't think I'd have too much of a problem re-matting and re-framing it even if I took it to Frames R Us or some such place.

I still have no idea as to how to send it rolled up if I found a buyer. How safe would it be and where would I get a cannister for that? Would Fedex have things like that? I wouldn't want to roll it very tight.

Again, thanks for the link and for the info. If you can think of any other info, please post!! I do appreciate it!! Very nice of you!

shay


Oh! I forgot to address the documentation question. The only thing I have is a smaller, postcard size, reproduction of the lithograph, with information on the back of it - I think the original price of the lithograph is also included on that postcard thing. Problem is when I moved from Florida in 2003 across country I packed it among my papers and now have no idea where it is. I really need to try and find it, but I am still living out of boxes (I came to the west coast to go to grad school) and actually, the only reason I need to sell the Backus is to try to gather up funds to return to Florida. I certainly don't want to sell the Backus. I love it, actually, and I know I'll never be able to purchase one on my own. But it is among the things I inherited that I am considering to sell in order to come back home.

#4 jack

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Posted 22 January 2006 - 06:14 PM

A gallery that was asking $2000 framed may only pay $500 for it. You may want to try ebay.

You may be able to get a tube at office depot. We buy them 10 cases at time so our supplier would not be good for you. Fedex had triangular boxes that I would not recdomend using because it will get damaged.

You definately have a valueable limited edition lithograph. Good luck with it and let me know how it works out for you or if you have any other questions.
Jack

#5 shay

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Posted 22 January 2006 - 06:54 PM

Hi, Jack, thanks for the input on this. I understand about upping prices at galleries. And I am considering Ebay, for sure. But if my Backus can only be sold for about $500, I will keep it, since I feel it's worth much more than that - perhaps not $2,000, but more than $500 which is what my aunt and uncle paid for it in the late 70s.

I'll keep on top of all of this and let you know what happens. Thanks again for your replies. Means the world to me!

shay

#6 Colette

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Posted 05 August 2010 - 06:43 AM

I have the same lithograph as shay. Mine is 358/1000. My grandparents wintered in Ft. Pierce and knew Beanie well. I have four postcard sized paintings. I think they are paintings. dated 1976 and signed A E Backus. I see shay mentioned he had one similar to what I have. Does anyone know if these postcard sized paintings are common? I have been trying to research them to establish a value but have not been successful so far.

thanks for any information anyone may have for me.

Colette



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